Defective Nissan Murano Recalled

The California lemon law protects consumers and allows consumers who qualify for a lemon law buyback to demand manufacturer's to repurchase their defective cars. many agencies were established to ensure vehicle safety. The National Highway Traffic Safety Administration is one such agency. They recently released their May report of defective motor vehicles, some of these vehicles included those of GM, Chrysler, Volkswagen, Ford, Hyundai and Kia. The Nissan Murano, one of Nissan's top seeling vehicles, was recently ordered to recall 362,891 vehicles due to defective air intake ducts.

This comes as quite a surprise to many. The Murano was expected to be a crossover that challenged the status quo. This fusion of luxury, style, space and safety was a fresh look at vehicle design. Consumers certainly seemed to think so- the Murano was the best selling vehicle in the Nissan line and continues to grow as automobile sales begin to lull.

NHTSA's recall certainly thwarts the accolades and further proves that most manufacturers will have a few defective cars slip through the cracks. In Nissan's case about five times as many as those of GMs entire line of vehicles for the month of May.

The air intake ducts which are a component of the engine system may separate with movement from the engine. This can cause premature wear of the material use din the intake ducts. This shrinking phenomenon of the air intake ducts may cause the vehicle to stall. A vehicle crash may occur and endanger drivers and passengers alike (NHTSA campaign 09V-169).

Recalls are not to be taken lightly because these defects may cause serious injury or death. For this reason the Office of Defets Investigations has placed the Murano on the road for repairs. Nissan dealers were expected to begin performing the recall on June 6, 2009.

It's very important to understand how a recall may affect consumer's lemon law rights. A consumer may have already repeatedly returned their vehicle for repairs on the very defect giving rise to the recall. If they have already given the manufacturer through its repair facilities (dealers) a reasonable opportunity to repair the defect, they may be entitled to a buyback or replacement vehicle.

If they don't already qualify for a lemon law buyback, owners of a recalled vehicle should make sure all recall campaigns are completed immediately. Dealers must complete these repairs at no charge to the consumer. Defective motor vehicles do make it passed the factory and onto the road. It's difficult to test every single car that is manufactured, as such it is important for consumers to be aware of their rights under the California lemon law. Lemon laws were created to protect consumers and if consumers feel they are owners of a defective car then contacting an attorney is the logical first step. Visit Norman Taylor & Associates at www.normantaylor.com.

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